Category Archives: Tuesday’s Tips

Learn The Strategies To Train Your Puppy To Accept The Collar And Lead

Walking on a collar and lead is an important skill that every dog must learn. Even the best trained dog should never be taken outside the home or yard without a sturdy collar and leash. Even if your dog is trained perfectly to go off lead, accidents and distractions do happen, and a collar, with proper identification attached, is the best way to be sure you will get your beloved companion back.

Of course before you can teach your new puppy to accept a leash, he or she must first learn to accept wearing a collar. The first step is to choose a collar that fits the dog properly. It is important to measure the puppy’s neck, and to choose a collar size accordingly.

After the collar has been put on the puppy, simply let him or her get used to it. It is not unusual for a puppy to try to pull on the collar, whine, roll or squirm when first introduced to a collar.

The best strategy is to simply ignore the puppy and let him or her get used to the collar. It is a mistake to either punish the dog for playing with the collar or to encourage the behavior. Distracting the puppy often helps, and playing with a favorite toy, or eating some favorite treats, can help the puppy quickly forget that he or she is wearing this strange piece of equipment.

After the dog has learned to accept the collar, try adding the leash. Hook the leash to the collar and simply sit and watch the puppy. Obviously, this should only be done either in the house or in a confined outdoor area. The puppy should be allowed to drag the leash around on its own, but of course the owner should keep a close eye on the puppy to ensure that the leash does not become snagged or hung up on anything.

At first, the leash should only be left on for a few minutes at a time. It is a good idea to attach the leash at mealtimes, playtime and other positive times in the life of the puppy.

That way the puppy will begin to associate the leash with good things and look forward to it. If the puppy shows a high degree of fear of the leash, it is a good idea to place it next to the food bowl for awhile to let him get used to it slowly. Eventually, he will come to understand that the leash is nothing to be afraid of.

After the puppy is comfortable with walking around the house wearing the leash, it is time for you to pick up the end of the leash for a few minutes. You should not try to walk the puppy on the leash; simply hold the end of the leash and follow the puppy around as he or she walks around. You should try to avoid situations where the leash becomes taut, and any pulling or straining on the leash should be avoided. It is fine for the puppy to sit down. Try a few games with the collar and lead.

For instance, back up and encourage the puppy to walk toward you. Don’t drag the puppy forward, simply encourage him to come to you. If he does, praise him profusely and reward him with a food treat or toy. You should always strive to make all the time spent on the leash as pleasant as possible.

It is important to give the puppy plenty of practice in getting used to walking on the leash in the home. It is best to do plenty of work in the home, since it is a safe environment with few distractions. After the puppy is comfortable walking indoors on a leash, it is time to start going outside, beginning of course in a small, enclosed area like a fenced yard.

After the puppy has mastered walking calmly outdoors on a leash, it is time to visit some places where there are more distractions. You may want to start with a place like a neighbor’s yard. Walking your new puppy around the neighborhood is a good way to introduce your neighbors to the new puppy, while giving the puppy valuable experience in avoiding distractions and focusing on his leash training.

Puppies sometimes develop bad habits with their leashes, such as biting or chewing on the leash. To discourage this type of behavior, try applying a little bit of bitter apple, Tabasco sauce or similar substance (just make sure the substance you use is not toxic to dogs). This strategy usually convinces puppies that chewing the leash is a bad idea.

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Can You Control Who The Alpha Dog Is When You Own Two Dogs

A dog owner named Beth writes:

Dear Mr. Katz,

I have two cocker spaniels that are one year apart. The red and white female (Cassie)is almost two and spayed. The buff male (Peanut) is just one 1 years old and neutered. Peanut was rescued from a cocker shelter in October of 1999. He is incredibly devoted, a very good listener and quick learner. He is the ideal dog as he is very eager to please. Cassie on the other hand is the most independent and stubborn dog I have ever encountered (you’ve probably seen worse). She used to only listen to commands when she wanted but I have put a stop to that. I have had numerous problems with her dominant tendencies but have come a long way. She now views me as the alpha and only displays aggression when she is in pain – specifically when I brush her. She has been diagnosed with allergies, is on allergy shots and has bad skin. This is not my problem though as I think I can work through this one with the use of the training collar.

ADAM INTERJECTS: It’s very difficult to correct pain-response aggression. It’s more of a reaction than anything else. Use the muzzle and restrain the dog when you need to give her shots. Other times (just so that she doesn’t build a negative association to the muzzle) put it on, take it off, and then give her a cookie. Do this at random times.

BETH CONTINUES: Cassie displays a lot of dominance aggression toward Peanut. She growls when he tries to pick up a bone near her and when they play (or fight) she will “hump” him. I always feed her first, give her treats first, pet her first but Peanut just doesn’t seem to get it. He will walk through the door before Cassie but after me. He is always one head length ahead of her when we walk outside. Further, I think he is trying to challenge her because the playing time more recently has turned into fighting. It’s more barking than anything — to date there has been no blood. However, Cassie usually is on top of him, pinning him to the ground, and he lets out this barking/yelping noise when she releases, he goes right after her again until I break it up.

She also displays the same aggression toward the cat. If the cat comes into her “area” when she is comfortable in front of the fire or if the cat even walks by one of her bones she goes crazy. She’ll chase the cat away with growling and quickly running after her.

ADAM INTERJECTS AGAIN: You can correct this behavior. She will learn not to chase the cat in the house.

BETH CONTINUES: So here’s the big question. What do I do? Do I continue to treat Cassie as the next in the pack? Do I let them fight it out? Do I continue to scold her for chasing the cat? HELP!

Any advice you can offer will be much appreciated. Your book is great by the way….

Regards,

Beth

Dear Beth:

Thanks for the question.

There is ONE big point you’re not conceptualizing: You can only affect your relationship with each dog. You can be dominant to both dogs. Or you can be dominant to only one dog. Or you can be viewed as the Omega dog (the most submissive one) by both dogs.

However, you cannot control how your dogs view each other. This is a topic I’ve written about in past issues of my e-zine. I’m going to reprint it for your benefit:

A subscriber wrote: “Thanks, Adam. I think I found the answer. ‘We determine who will be the alpha dog.’ Correct? “

My reply:

“No, no no! You cannot do this! It’s impossible!!!

The dogs’ temperaments are inherent. Only you can determine if you’re dominant to the other dogs, by being MORE DOMINANT. But you cannot work it out for them.

You can control the dogs’ behaviors and not allow any scuffles if you:

– are the alpha dog in the pack.

and

– you have voice control.

But as soon as you leave the dogs together– unsupervised– and go out for dinner… all bets are off. The dominant one will still be the dominant one.

Think of taking a group of four kids.

Kid#1 will grow up to be a Navy Seal, and then an Admiral.

Kid#2 will grow up to be a fierce criminal defense attorney.

Kid#3 will grow up to be a middle management executive for a large firm.

Kid#4: will grow up to be a peace activist and a socialist.

Now, when you leave the house every day for work, you may say, “Kid#4… you’re in charge.” And as long as you’re around, Kid#4 may get the privileges of being the “so-called” top dog.

But as soon as you leave…

It’s going to be a given that kid#3 and kid#4 are going to be the bottom dogs, and kid #1 and kid#2 will scrap-it-out to see who is REALLY the “top dog.” Their genetics (and to some extent, upbringing– depending upon their age) determines this. But it is the toughest kid who will become the group leader.

Even though kid #2 may be fairly tough in his own right, he will test kid#1… but will ultimately lose… as kid#1 is too tough.

Now, if kid#1 gets sick and has to stay in bed, then kid#2 becomes the new kid#1.

In other words, the “Alpha dog.”

Until you get home. Then you’re the alpha dog, and he becomes the beta dog.

Get it?

Beth, as far as you’ve described your dogs’ interactions… it doesn’t sound to me like you’ve got a problem. It sounds just like play, or perhaps some dominance scuffles. However, without seeing the dogs in person it’s impossible to tell for sure.

That’s all for now, folks!

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Choosing The Right Dog Breed

Were you aware that there are literally hundreds of distinct dog breeds? When you decide to get a dog, choosing the right dog breed for you and your family is essential. With so many different dog breeds available, this can become a very daunting task. Luckily, there are ways in which you can narrow down your options somewhat, making the whole thing a lot easier.

First and foremost you should be considering one major factor….. How much space do you have? If you live in an apartment there is little point in getting a large dog that takes up a lot of room and may also need a lot of exercising. For living areas with limited space, consider the Toy group of dogs such as the Terrier Group or Miniature Pinscher. Also the cost of keeping your dog should be evaluated. Very large dogs may eat significant amounts of food whereas smaller dogs will eat very little in comparison. Try doing a rough calculation of cost for several different dog breeds over a twelve month period. Take into consideration food and regular visits to the vet for inoculation, worming etc. You will see that larger dogs are very often much more expensive to keep.

If you have children, you may want to consider what dog breed would suit them. Children can be quite heavy handed with pets sometimes; getting a Chihuahua for example may not be such a good idea as they are delicate animals. Similarly, having a Great Dane or Saint Bernard marauding around the house could be dangerous for a child. The age and number of children you have should definitely be considered as this will affect what type of dog would best suit your circumstances.

Another major point to consider is how much exercise you can offer your dog. If you have a reasonable sized yard, fencing it off will provide a good space for your dog to exercise itself. If you live in an apartment, consider getting a dog that requires very little exercise. An excitable Border collie would be a poor choice for an apartment life. Also, how much exercise can YOU put up with? There is no point getting a dog that requires lots of exercise such as a Hunting or Sporting dog breed if you cannot keep up the exercise regime. Try and get a dog that suits your lifestyle.

Grooming you dog is something to think about. If you do not have a lot of spare time in your life try to avoid dog breeds like the Standard Poodle which will need very regular grooming sessions. The short haired Terriers or Whippets make a good choice for somebody who has little time to sit and groom for hours at a time. Conversely if you have a lot of free time, regular grooming sessions with your dog will provide you both with a lot of quality time that you will both enjoy.

When choosing your dog, take a look at the bigger picture. Try to resist the temptation to go for the cutest, cuddliest, adorable dog you can find. Consider your lifestyle, your home, your family and try to find a dog breed that fits best with your life. After all, your new dog will be sharing your life with you for many years to come so making sure that you are both happy is an important thing to consider.

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Preventing Your Dog From Catching Diseases

Like any other pet, dogs, if not properly cared and maintained, could get diseases. Here are some parasites that cause dog diseases.

– Heartworm. Mosquito bites cause heartworm to exist in a dog and will reside in your pet’s heart and nearby blood vessels. A dog infected by heartworms looks dull and may even have a chronic cough. If possible, ask your veterinarian if your dog could be given a heartworm medication when it is the season of mosquitoes.

– Hookworm. Hookworms can be given by the mother dog to a puppy during the nursing period or even before birth. Hookworms cause dog anemia and appetite loss.

– Roundworm. The transmittal of roundworms is very much like how hookworms get transmitted in a dog. An infected dog usually has a potbelly. Roundworms cause pneumonia, diarrhea, dehydration, stunted growth, and vomiting.

– Tapeworm. A dog gets tapeworms if it swallows fleas that are larvae-laden. Much of the symptoms that are obvious rarely show, but in the dog’s feces, you could see deposits of rice-like appearance.

– Whipworm. A dog infected with whipworms may have diarrhea and other ailments like, stool mucus, and serious bowel inflammation. Extreme weight loss is also a symptom caused by whipworms.

– Fleas. Fleas, the commonest among external parasites, cause the dog to continuously scratch various parts of the body. This results to fur loss. Ask your veterinarian on a good flea-control program, since fleas could become resistant to some products over time.

– Lice. Lice can infect less common compared with fleas. Plus, they can be controlled easier.

– Ticks. Ticks can pose more serious problems than fleas because diseases like Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever, or Lyme disease, can be contracted with ticks. Tweezers can be used to remove ticks one by one. If you do not know how to remove ticks properly and carefully, ask your vet first. If you do know how, ticks should be placed in a can with soap and water.

Treating dog diseases

Some ways of treating dog diseases that your vet might use:

– Pills

– Liquid medicine

– Eye drops and ointment

– Ear drops and ointment

With proper care and prevention, your pet dog would be generally free and safe from various diseases. If you notice something’s wrong with your dog, immediately consult with your vet. You will never know what might happen.

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Dog House Building And Buying Guide

Dog owners have to consider several factors when buying or building a house for their pets. As a true member of your own family, providing your pet with the best home possible is of the utmost importance.

i. Size

A German Shepherd, Golden Retriever, Rottweiler and other large dogs should have large houses, while the Chihuahua and smaller breeds will need smaller houses. The door of the house does not need to be based on the height of the dog from the ground to the top of its head, or even taller, as it will lower its head to be able to enter the house. The width of the door should be just enough to accommodate the dog. These height and width measurements can be adjusted if there is a physical requirement to do so. The house should also be large enough for the dog to stand at full height inside, move around and lie down. Owners should remember that a larger-than-needed home will compromise the dog’s retention of body heat during the winter or colder months.

ii. Weather Conditions

Some dog houses are made with hinged roofs, a feature that allows owners to raise the roof during hot and humid weather. This flexibility provides adequate air flow to flush out warm air and allow fresh or cool air to enter. In some cases, these roofs can also be lowered, creating a smaller space for the dog and enhancing its ability to retain heat during rainy or cold weather. Asphalt shingles should be used only if there is an adequate insulation barrier separating the roof from the main area of the house. Many house models also come with slanted roofs, ensuring that water drains away during rainy days. Owners should avoid building or buying houses with barn-type or peak-style roofs, as these would attract hornets, wasps and other insects and prevent heat retention. Another option is wind walls, which can be inserted into the dog house to break the wind and keep the house warmer. The house should also be a reasonable distance off the ground to keep it dry. For owners with bigger budgets, some house manufacturers offer provisions for heaters and air-conditioners. These climate control systems help ensure comfort for the dog regardless of weather conditions.

iii. Doors

The front door of the dog house should be located to one side instead of in the middle. This will prevent the dog from being directly exposed to extreme weather conditions and other harsh environmental elements. Some models are designed with removable doors, or with no doors at all. Using a door will help keep the dog house warmer during cold months. An awning type cover can also be used over the opening for added shade and protection.

iv. Easy To Clean And Maintain

– Removable or adjustable roofs

– Doors, partitions

– Wind walls

– Flexibility in cleaning

– Restrict use of paint, stains, or water sealers for the outside of the house

v. Use Wood

Plastic and metal houses are not a good idea, as they are either too hot during summertime or too cold during the winter. Some market experts say that houses made from natural western red cedar wood offer the best insulation for dogs during winter while making them cooler during summer. Red cedar wood oils are also natural repellants of ticks, fleas and termites. Houses made from this material are also maintenance-free on the outside, although owners have a choice of finishing it to complement their property. Sprinkling red cedar wood chips or shavings in the bedding also helps prevent infestation. Owners should also remember that wooden roofs help cut down heat build-up from the sun while helping to maintain reasonable heat retention levels.

vi. Keep The Dog House Elevated

For legless houses, the owner must remember that having it directly on the ground increases the likelihood that the pet would be exposed to cold and wet weather. This also raises the possibility of infestation from flea eggs that hatch in the soil. The owner can use bricks, rocks or stones arranged in a level and stable manner to elevate the house. The elevation will allow air to flow beneath the house and prevent moisture from forming at the bottom.

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Spite Isn’t A Dog Thing Separation Anxiey Is

Dog owners, when they get together, will tell stories of their amazing, brilliant, astonishing and misbehaving dogs. How many times have you heard about the pet who, displeased by its owners’ absence, left a “present” of the most unpleasant kind?

The truth is – he didn’t do it out of spite. Dogs aren’t people. People are the only animals that have an idea of “spite,” “revenge,” or “getting even.” That’s not to say that dogs don’t have emotions – any dog owner knows better. But most will agree that dogs aren’t planners – they live completely in the moment – a skill humans can only attempt.

The only time to correct a dog for improper behavior is when you catch the dog in the act. Revisiting the scene of the crime doesn’t help. The dog doesn’t remember committing the crime. Yelling at the dog when you find the mess teaches the dog that finding a mess is bad. Therefore, in dog logic, it will learn to hide the mess, not refrain from creating it.

If you’ve been tempted to accuse your dog of “spiteful” behavior because it does leave messes when you’re gone, it’s time to rethink what’s going on. Your dog isn’t telling you that it’s angry you left – it’s telling you it’s anxious and unsure when you’re not there.

It’s been said many times that dogs are pack animals. If you are the leader of the pack – as you should be – then your dog is, for its entire life, a juvenile member of the group. Your dog may be a victim of separation anxiety; it doesn’t know what to do when its leader isn’t there to tell him.

Now that we understand, somewhat, how a dog thinks, we can use that to create the behavior we want. Crate training your dog is a good way to alleviate many sources of anxiety – both yours and your dog’s. A crate, or cage, is civilization’s answer to a cave or den. Your dog can feel safe and secure in its den. A crate should be big enough to allow the dog to stand up, turn around, and lie down. That’s it.

Don’t project your claustrophobia onto your dog. It likes feeling safe, secure and enclosed. It likes not being responsible for checking out every noise. It’s happy when it has no decisions to make. Never let a dog make a decision – it will choose wrong.

There are people who resist the idea of a crate. They think they are being kind to the dog. And there are some dogs who do not need their crates past puppyhood. But if your dog is prone to separation anxiety, you’ll both be better off with a crate. If you’ve never used a crate, or put it away as your dog matured, introduce it gradually. Leave it out, door open. Feed the dog in the crate. Throw toys into the crate for it to fetch. Never, ever use the crate as punishment, nor as a substitute for a trip outside to eliminate. Dogs shouldn’t be left alone more than six to eight hours. If your schedule requires an animal to be left alone 10 or 12 hours a day – get a dogwalker, or settle for a cat.

When you begin crate training, only leave the dog in the crate for a few minutes. Have a special treat or toy that the dog gets only in his crate. Many people use a hollow rubber toy with a bit of peanut butter or soft cheese spread inside. Happily tell your dog it’s time to “kennel,” (the word you choose doesn’t matter, just be consistent) and put the toy in the crate.

If the dog doesn’t come – go get it. Never tell your dog to “come” to you for something it doesn’t enjoy. Place it in the crate, close the latch and walk away. Just a few minutes the first time. If the dog whines or cries, ignore it. When it’s quiet, let the dog out and tell her she’s wonderful.

Build up the time your dog is left in the crate gradually. Conventional wisdom says that the first 15 minutes are the best indicator. If the dog settles within that time he’ll be fine. And you’ll both be happy – Fido has no decisions to make, and you’ll have no messes to clean.

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Puppy Love Secrets To Professional Dog Training

You’re proud of the new member of your family, that furry four-legged creature that is full of unconditional love and that will be with you for years to come. All too often, though, a new puppy or dog can wreak havoc on your home, yard, and neighborly relationships. For the sake of a happy home life and a contented puppy, dog training is a necessity. The right approach, combined with professional dog obedience training, will ensure that your newest family member will fit right in. Here are four secrets that the pros use for success.

1. Who’s the Top Dog?

By nature, dogs travel in packs, with the alpha dog as the leader of the pack. There can only be one alpha dog per pack; otherwise, chaos would ensue and the safety of the pack would be in peril. Your dog needs to understand that you are the alpha dog of the pack. You communicate that to your dog by exerting your leadership, such as taking him for a walk when you come home from work or by successfully completing a dog obedience training course together. You also exert your alpha dog status by controlling your dog’s food. When he knows that you feed him twice a day, it reinforces your position as top dog.

2. Consistency is Key

Virtually every dog trainer will tell you that humans are generally at fault when dogs don’t successfully learn commands. That’s because dogs see the world in black and white, whereas humans see the world in shades of gray. For humans, “Come” and “C’mon” mean the same thing; a dog, on the other hand, may understand “Come” but is clueless as to what his owner wants when he says, “C’mon.” Whenever you want to modify your dog’s behavior or teach it a command, use a consistent vocabulary and tone.

3. Mutual Respect Leads to Obedience

A happy and healthy human-canine relationship is based on mutual respect. Your dog respects your position as the alpha of the pack and you respect his needs. Contrary to what you may read, respect and obedience do not grow out of a package of doggie treats, nor do they grow out of fear. Excessive rewards and excessive sternness will lead to erratic behavior, while appropriate praise and correction will lead to respect.

4. Timing is Everything

Timing comes into play in various aspects of dog training. The adage, “You can’t teach an old dog new tricks,” isn’t entirely correct, but it is much easier to train a puppy than it is an older dog. Some people make the mistake of engaging their dogs in long, drawn-out training sessions. Like young children, the attention spans of dogs are relatively short, and fun 15-minute lessons are more likely to bring results than hour-long drills. Timing is also key when establishing your alpha role. For example, the alpha dog eats first, so you should feed your dog after you’ve finished with your meal.

Dog training is a necessity, but it doesn’t have to be a chore. Regardless of the location of your dog training – Chicago, San Francisco, or Miami – you should find a dog trainer that both you and your dog enjoy, and work with her or him to make your new family member feel right at home.

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How To Train Your Dog Not To Chew

Chewing is something that comes naturally to every dog. Every dog feels the instinctual need to sharpen its teeth and hone his biting skills. Chewing on the right things, like specially designed chew toys for instance, can even help the dog clean his teeth and remove plaque.

Even though chewing is natural and healthy, that does not mean that the dog should be given carte blanche and allowed to chew everything in sight. It is vital for every dog to learn the difference between the things it is OK to chew on, like toys and ropes, and the things that are off limits, such as carpets, shoes and other items.

When working with a new puppy, it is advisable to keep the puppy in a small, puppy proofed room for at least a few weeks. This is important not only to prevent chewing but to properly house train the puppy as well.

Older dogs should also be confined to a small area at first. Doing this allows the dog to slowly acquaint him or herself to the smells and sights of the new household.

When you set up this small, confined area, be sure to provide the puppy or dog with a few good quality chew toys to keep him entertained while you are not able to supervise him. Of course the dog should also be provided with a warm place to sleep and plenty of fresh clean water.

As the dog is slowly moved to larger and larger portions of the home, there may be more opportunities to chew inappropriate items. As the dog is given freer access to the home, it is important to keep any items that the dog or puppy should not chew, things like throw rugs, shoes, etc. up off of the floor. If you forget to move something and come home to find that the dog has chewed it, resist the urge to punish or yell at the dog. Instead, distract the dog with one of its favorite toys and remove the inappropriate item from its mouth.

The dog should then be provided with one of its favorite toys. Praise the dog extensively when it picks up and begins to chew its toy. This will help to teach the dog that it gets rewarded when it chews certain items, but not when it chews other items.

Teaching the dog what is appropriate to chew is very important, not only for the safety of your expensive furniture and rugs, but for the safety of the dog as well. Many dogs have chewed through dangerous items like extension cords and the like. This of course can injure the dog severely or even spark a fire.

Most dogs learn what to chew and what not to chew fairly quickly, but others are obviously going to be faster learners than others. Some dogs chew because they are bored, so providing the dog with lots of toys and solo activities is very important.

It is also a good idea to schedule several play times every day, with one taking place right before you leave every day. If the dog is thoroughly tired after his or her play session, chances are he or she will sleep the day away.

Other dogs chew to exhibit separation anxiety. Many dogs become very nervous when their owners leave, and some dogs become concerned each time that the owner may never come back. This stress can cause the dog to exhibit all manners of destructive behavior, including chewing soiling the house. If separation anxiety is the root of the problem, the reasons for it must be addressed, and the dog assured that you will return.

This is best done by scheduling several trips in and out of the home every day, and staggering the times of those trips in and out. At first the trips can be only a few minutes, with the length slowly being extended as the dog’s separation anxiety issues improve.

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Global Positioning Finding Your Lost Pet Quickly

It’s every pet owner’s nightmare- your dog is lost. Your dog is outside facing the elements and the dangers all alone. You don’t know where they are and you have no idea how to go about finding them.

Most dogs just love to explore and some breeds are more prone to straying further than others. Hunting dogs like beagles are even more adventurous than other kinds of dogs and will quickly stray out of sight.

It’s not just hunting dogs that can go missing. Dogs and cats escape all the time. Whether it’s the dog that escapes underneath your feet as you open the door or the cat who has escaped over the weekend. Pets also face all kinds of dangers while traveling with their owners.

If you’re pet does get lost finding them soon will reduce the threat of serious harm coming to them. A pet that is lost after nightfall has significantly less chance of being found safe and returned alive. The cold temperatures and dangers of traffic are increased and your pet becomes more vulnerable to attack by wild animals too.

If this all sounds like a nightmare to you there is a method of keeping track of your pet which might alleviate your worries. Using satellite technology you can keep tabs on where your pet is. GPS technology is not new for cars and boats but for pets it’s pretty new. Global Positioning Systems can now be used to keep track of your dog or cat.

The system uses governmental surveillance techniques with satellites; enabling a Mobile System for Communications (GSM). This means you can use your phone or laptop to keep track of anything from your car to your dog. You will need a service provider to relay the information to you which you will need to pay for.

A tracking device can be attached to your dog’s collar; so it doesn’t hurt or hinder them in any way. Except for curbing that adventurous spirit a bit! The system is very personalized – you can set perimeters and zones and you can change them as you travel or even move house to house. These “safe zones” can be set so you are alerted whenever your pet leaves an area determined by you.

If you choose GPS; remember it is only effective as part of a wider strategy. There’s no substitute for proper training but there are some tools you can use to make your pet safer.

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What You Should Know About Crate Training One Of The Most Effective Ways Of House Training Any Puppy Or Dog

Crate training is one of the most effective ways of house training any puppy or dog. Crate training is very efficient, and very effective, since it uses the natural instinct of the dog to achieve the desired result of a clean house and a well trained dog.

The concept behind crate training is that a dog naturally strives to avoid soiling the area where it eats and sleeps. By placing the dog in the crate, this instinct is enhanced. The dog will come to see the crate as its den, and it will try to avoid soiling its den.

The key to successful crate training for a puppy or an older dog, as with other forms of dog training, is to establish a good routine. This routine will enhance the ability of the dog to do its business in the right place, and avoid eliminating in the wrong place. It is important to shower the dog with praise each and every time it eliminates in the established toilet area, and not to express frustration or anger when the dog makes a mistake.

It is important to confine the dog or puppy to a small part of the house, generally one puppy proofed room, when you are not at home. The room should contain a soft bed, fresh water and some favorite toys to prevent the dog from becoming bored and frustrated.

Crate training is different from confining the dog to one room, however. With crate training, the puppy or dog is confined to a crate when unsupervised. The idea is that the dog will think of this crate as its home, and not want to soil is home.

When crate training, it is important to remove the dog from the crate as soon as possible after returning home, and to take the dog promptly to the previously established toilet area. When the dog does its business in this toilet area, be sure to provide lots of praise and treats. It is important that the dog learn to associate proper toilet procedures with good things like treats and toys.

It is important to never leave the dog in its crate for long periods of time, as this will confuse the dog and force it to soil its sleeping area. The crate is simply a tool, and it should not be abused by leaving the dog in it for extended periods of time. If the dog is left in the crate for too long, it could set back the training program by weeks if not months.

The dog should only be confined to the crate when you are at home. Except for nighttime, the dog should be given the opportunity to relieve itself every 45 minutes or so. Each time the dog is taken out, it should be put on a leash and immediately taken outside. Once outside the house, the dog should be given three to five minutes to do its business. If the dog does not eliminate in this time period, it should be immediately returned to the create.

If the dog does its business during the set time period, it should be rewarded with praise, food, play, affection and either an extended walk or a period of play inside or outside the home.

During the crate training period, it is important to keep a daily diary of when the dog does its business each day. If the dog is on a regular feeding schedule, the toilet schedule should be consistent as well. Having a good idea of when the dog needs to eliminate each day will be a big help during the house training process. After the dog has used his established toilet area, you will be able to give the dog free run of the house to play and enjoy himself.

Dealing with accidents during crate training

It is very important to not punish the puppy or dog when it makes a mistake or has an accident during the crate training process. If there has been an accident, simply clean it up. Accidents during house training mean that you have provided the dog with unsupervised access to the house too quickly.

The dog should not be allowed unsupervised access to the home until you can trust her bowel and bladder habits. If mistakes do occur, it is best to go back to crate training. Taking a couple of steps back will help move the house training process along, while moving too quickly could set things back.

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